What if we could offer companionship and comfort to those in need?

“Loving Jesus doesn’t always cure suicidal thoughts.

Loving Jesus doesn’t always cure depression.

Loving Jesus doesn’t always cure PTSD.

Loving Jesus doesn’t always cure anxiety.

But that doesn’t mean Jesus doesn’t offer us companionship and comfort.

He ALWAYS does that.”

5:01 PM · Sep 9, 2019· – @Jarrid Wilson

I don’t know that depression, suicidal thoughts, PTSD, trauma can be cured, there is healing, but not sure there is a cure. But for sure the excruciating and mind numbing pain and suffering they can be managed. It requires vigilant up keeping of all that it takes: therapy, medicine, skills to manage anxiety and cognitive and behavior therapy to modify distorted thought and behavior, and it really takes a community and network of support to maintain one’s mental health.

I just want to say, if you are feeling hopeless, depressed, suicidal, or suffering from any pain, that I have been there and am here now and am more than happy to be here for you. Reach out, because invisibility of depression means we don’t always see it even when it’s really painful.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
Call 1-800-273-8255
P.S. Prayer request – I feel I have to speak on this issue.  So I’m going to preach on depression, mental illness, and suicides this coming Sunday. Please pray for me to speak clearly in a way that is helpful and to have boldness and courage to speak out about how God has worked in my life as well.

Hydrochlorothiazide and dehydration

I have been feeling dehydrated too often in the past few weeks.  Sometimes dehydration and low temperature (like 100.9 at highest) and headache, or also accompanied by low motivation and low energy.  Friend advised me to take Nuun, which is a tablet of electrolytes, and one I happened to buy also had caffeine in it.  So I was regularly supplementing my water intake with some kind of sport drink.

Then it occurred to me yesterday, as I was going to order more sports drink, something clicked in my head as I was reading about dehydration that blood pressure medicine, ones that are diuretic works by eliminating salts (electrolytes) in your body.  So my medicine, hydrochlorothiazide is working to eliminate fluids and electrolytes from my body and I was drinking additional water and electrolytes to not feel so tired and/or to relieve headache and other symptoms!

So I wrote an e-mail to my doctor explaining my dilemma and situation that needed immediate attention.  No reply by end of the day.  So I called and got an appointment with doctor who had earliest opening.

On my own accord, I took half the hydrochloriothiazide pill this morning.  I can always take the other half later today after I talk to new doctor.  My regular PCP who was the best internist I’ve had in my LIFE, retired.  So I have to go see a new internist today, explain my dehydration situation that has been debilitating me and preventing me from working and exercising.  And I have to get her on board to cut down hydrochlorothiazide dose and get me on another blood pressure medicine if I need further medicine intervention for my blood pressure.

Anyone else experience dehydration from their hypertension medicine?

Anyone have any advice or insight about how exercising and losing weight does or does not improve your high blood pressure?  I have lost about 20 (more but then gained again) lbs in past 2 years and been exercising regularly.  So I was hoping my blood pressure medicine would need to be adjusted, to take less of it, but that has not happened yet.

Thanks for any insight, advice, personal story.  Getting older, wiser, more mature, I love.  Side effects of medicine I have to take, I do not love.

Long term use of antidepressants

This article about new concerns about long term use of antidepressants got me so excited!

New Concerns – article on WSJ 8/29/2019

I was going to go talk to my psychiatrist and lobby to get off my antidepressants since I’ve been doing so well, functional and all.  But then I read the following paragraph…

“The big danger of going off antidepressants is the risk of relapse. People who have had one episode of depression have a 50% chance of having a second. Those who have had two episodes have an 80% chance of having another. Staying on antidepressant medication can cut the risk of relapse in half, according to a review of 15 clinical trials published in 2014 in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.”

So chance of relapse for me is not worth Dr. taking me off medicine.  So for me it’s not likely to happen.  But for those that statistics stand on your side, see these guidelines, also in the article:

Managing Long-Term SSRI Use

Beth Salcedo, a psychiatrist and the president of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, has these tips for patients:

*Check in with your doctor regularly—at least twice a year—to assess whether the drug is still needed or working, or if the dose needs adjusting.

*If you decide to stop the medication, do it under a doctor’s guidance and taper it very slowly—over a few months or longer—to minimize withdrawal symptoms and make it easier to reverse course if anxiety or depression surges.

*Do a course of cognitive behavioral therapy before or while going off medication. This can give you skills to manage anxiety and depression and can help prevent a relapse.

*Identify early warning signs that a relapse may be on the horizon, like difficulty sleeping or avoiding social engagements, so you can quickly adjust or restart treatment.

 

Peace!

Meditation to Clear Clutter in your mind

I’m not an expert meditation and I’m not a regular practitioner of meditation.  But this meditation works for me because it is only 7 minutes long, it uses imagery of organizing a desk to declutter your mind (which works for me because I’m usually sitting AT MY DESK!), and guides you to organize or cut out clutter that you don’t need on your desk, I mean, your life!

Shout out to – Philosophize This!

Discovered podcasts by Stephen West on Philosophize This!  He has a 5 part series on Gilles Deleuze and it is excellent!  His explanation is clear, easy to understand, and he argues for the relevance and significance of Deleuze’s ideas. So so good!

Deleuze’s concepts – shift of focus from being to becoming, affirming existence in terms of difference, concept of machines instead of substance, and importance of the interconnectedness of events over identity –  are explained by Stephen West in clear way that captures nuances and complexity of ideas.  I am really impressed.

I recommend listening to all 5 podcasts in order, but if you only have time for one or have background knowledge of Deleuze, you could work your way backwards.

Thank you, Stephen West for your amazing podcasts on Deleuze!  And how about some future podcasts on affect theory???

Gilles Deleuze – Difference pt. 5 on Philosophize This!

Gilles Deleuze – Flows pt. 4 on Philosophize This!

Gilles Deleuze – Anti-Oedipus pt. 3 on Philosophize This!

Gilles Deleuze – Immanence pt. 2 on Philosophize This!

Gilles Deleuze – What is Philosophy? pt. 1 on Philosophize This!

This Instagram post!

I was inspired by this post: www.instagram.com/p/BybO-FwhbdJ/

by @heysarahcarter to write this comment… “Your commitment to show up to create space for the broken And bruised hearted – this speaks to my spirit. Because the broken and bruised hearts, where can we call home?”

Benediction by Nadia Bolz-Weber, at the funeral of Rachel Held Evans

I preached today about how to live the life of Christians, here and now, even as we pray, Come, Lord Jesus. During the sermon, I read the benediction by Rev. Nadia Bolz-Weber, which was read at the funeral of Rachel Held Evans.  I read the benediction during the sermon as an example of the kind of life we must live as Christians, the kind of prayer we must pray in today’s day and world. .

..So gifted, so loved, so loving, so sad, and yet the world is a better and happier place because of Rachel…

Video of the funeral of Rachel Held Evans

Benediction by The Rev. Nadia Bolz-Weber, at the funeral of Rachel Held Evans

“Blessed are the agnostics. Blessed are they who doubt. Blessed are those who have nothing to offer. Blessed are the preschoolers who cut in line at communion. Blessed are the poor in spirit. You are of heaven and Jesus blesses you.

“Blessed are those whom no one else notices. The kids who sit alone at middle-school lunch tables. The laundry guys at the hospital. The sex workers and the night-shift street sweepers. The closeted. The teens who have to figure out ways to hide the new cuts on their arms. Blessed are the meek. You are of heaven and Jesus blesses you.

“Blessed are they who have loved enough to know what loss feels like. Blessed are the mothers of the miscarried. Blessed are they who can’t fall apart because they have to keep it together for everyone else. Blessed are those who “still aren’t over it yet.” Blessed are those who mourn. You are of heaven and Jesus blesses you.

“I imagine Jesus standing here blessing us because I believe that is our Lord’s nature. This Jesus cried at his friend’s tomb, turned the other cheek, and forgave those who hung him on a cross because He was God’s Beatitude— He was God’s blessing to the weak in a world that only admires the strong.  

[And shall Rachel have this last word…]

“‘Jesus invites us into a story bigger than ourselves and our imaginations, yet we all get to tell that story with the scandalous particularity of this moment and this place. We are storytelling creatures because we are fashioned in the image of a storytelling God. May we never neglect that gift. May we never lose our love for telling the story. Amen.'”